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HONORS COLLEGE

HONORS COURSES Fall 2013



HNRS 101 Intro to the University (3) (CRN 17532)
10:30 AM 11:20 AM MW LH 103
10:30 AM 11:20 AM F GE 101
Instructor: Kimberly Engber
Designed especially for first-year students, with the goal of preparing students to succeed in college, including graduating in a timely fashion.  Provides students with information about: college expectations; academic major, career and life planning; study skills; teaching and learning styles; respecting diversity of thought and culture; critical thinking; leadership training; campus resources; university policies and procedures; personal finances; health and fitness; and the benefits of engagement in student organizations.  Students will be introduced to faculty and staff from across the campus, and will create an individualized graduation plan through a process of developmental advising. In addition, students will organize a community service project or leadership initiative.
 


HNRS 104B Art of Theater (3) (CRN 16708)
09:30 AM 10:45 AM TR NH 116
Instructor: Joyce Cavarozzi
What is art? Is it a valued part of our world? Does it matter in today's world? This seminar examines what Theatre is as an art form, and explores its value in our lives. It approaches these topics through readings, discussions and attendances at performances. Actors, designers, directors in the Wichita area bring their expertise to class through presentations and talk backs.
Besides readings and discussions, the course includes several experiential opportunities outside of the classroom. Creative projects for the class are also a strong component.

About the instructor: Joyce Cavarozzi is Emeritus Associate Professor of Theater in the School of Performing Arts-Theatre, specializing in directing and acting. She has directed over 100 productions, designed costumes for more than 150, and has extensive performance experience on stage, in television, and in film. She has been artist in residence at Michigan State University, and directed the 25th Anniversary Evening of Scenes at the Kennedy Center, Washington, DC. She has served as the President of the WSU Faculty Senate, received the WSU President’s Award for Distinguished Service, and is a member of the Screen Actors’ Guild. She is presently Vice Chair of the National Partners of American Theatre and co-president of the League of Women Voters, Wichita-Metro.
 


HNRS 153T From the Big Bang to Black Holes: The Fate of the Universe (3) (CRN 12742)
12:30 PM 03:00 PM M NH 116
Instructor: Martin Ratcliffe
You know about your own lifetime, about our country’s history, and some of Earth’s history, but do you know about the overall big picture story of the universe? How does everything fit together?  One of the greatest successes of human thought is that we now have an almost complete history of the universe, when it began, how it has developed until today, and how all the chemical elements arose, changing from the most basic elements to the complexity we find in our world today. This remarkable picture is described in this course, through careful explanation and a non-mathematical introduction to the theory of the Big Bang. We’ll discuss the most recent spacecraft missions that even now are adding ever more fine detail to our understanding of the universe, and ultimately convey our place in it. You’ll learn things that tie many different subjects together, contributing a valuable piece to your comprehensive education.
 


NEW!!!


HNRS 305C Fire in the Sky: Comet of the Century (3) (CRN 17546)
HNRS 307A Fire in the Sky: Comet of the Century (3) (CRN 17547)
04:30 PM 05:45 PM MW  NH 116
Instructors: Martin Ratcliffe and William Vanderburgh
Comet ISON is heading toward the middle of the solar system: if the predictions turn out to be correct, it will be the most impressive comet visible in the last 100 years—perhaps ever!  Shortly after it makes its closest approach to the sun in November 2013, ISON is predicted to be as bright as the full moon, visible in daylight, and with a tail as long as 45 degrees across the sky.  This astronomical visitor will be our inspiration to discuss a series of intriguing ideas: comets in history; comets and superstitions; how observations of comets influenced important figures in the early history of science such as Kepler and Newton; Halley’s comet and other notable comets; modern observations and space missions to study comets; what comets tell us about the structure and formation of the solar system; theories about comets bringing water to earth and seeding life on earth; theories about mass extinctions by comets; the possibility of future catastrophic earth impacts by comets and asteroids and what we can do about it; and more!  The course will be co-taught by a professional astronomer and a professional philosopher.  We will take a field trip to the Lake Afton Observatory to view the comet.  We are working on bringing in world-class guest speakers as well (including a former NASA astronaut—stay tuned!).  You can take this course under the 305C course number to earn upper division General Education credit in Humanities, or under 307A to earn upper division General Education credit in Natural Sciences.
 


HNRS 385 Advanced Academic Writing 3 Credits (CRN 14809)
11:00 AM 12:15 PM MW NH 116
Instructor: TBA
This course will allow the student writer to develop a coherent, concise, and literate academic writing style. Students will consider audiences, disciplines, and sources as signifiers of their own personal approach to writing, acknowledging that different audiences evaluate writing according to their own standards. Honors 385 will equip the WSU Honors students with the necessary tools to write for the scientist and the artist, to engage faculty and peers, and to write something both intelligent and meaningful. The course will focus on being correct while sounding intelligent. That, after all, is what style means.


HONORS INTERNSHIPS  and Cooperative Education-FALL 2013


Students in the Honors Program may take internship and co-op classes for Honors credit: Contact Co-operative Education (223 Grace Wilkie Hall) or the director of the Honors Program for information about existing opportunities (for example, at the Center for Community Support and Research).

HNRS 481.  Cooperative Education (1-4).  Complements and enhances the student’s academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment.  Offered Cr/NCr only.  Prerequisite: Consent of the Honors Program.

HNRS 481N.  Cooperative Education: Internship (1-4).  Complements and enhances the student’s academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern.  Offered Cr/NCr only.  Prerequisite:  Consent of the Honors Program.

 


Departmental Honors Courses

AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

AE 460H.  Selected Topic in Design - Honors (3) 1R; 3L (CRN 16820)
An experiential based aerospace design course for honors students.  Includes an introduction to basic Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) design methods, construction, and testing.  The course meets concurrently with and includes interactions with seniors enrolled in the AE 528 aerospace design class.  Includes design, construction, and testing of a small UAV.  Prerequisites:  Honors, sophomore or junior, aerospace engineering status.
• Assignments - Design, construct, and fly a small UAV. Develop and present mini-lectures, on select topics, to classmates.  Serve as external reviewers for AE 528 teams. Apply and develop design tools.
Feel free to contact Dr. Miller with questions (scott.miller@wichita.edu).

 


FRENCH

FREN 111H is the first course in the 3-class introductory series of French.  Students will develop the four fundamental skills in language learning (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) through a variety of activities in an appropriate cultural context.  This class requires daily classroom participation in French and daily practice outside the classroom via traditional written and oral activities as well as audio and written practice via electronic means (online workbook, Blackboard and the Internet).  Class objectives include the ability to communicate in French in oral and written format to perform simple tasks (e.g. talking about oneself, family and friends including physical and personality descriptions, discussing daily activities, asking questions, etc.).
Honors students will complete at least three projects in addition to the basic requirements for the course.  These projects will incorporate material from the class curriculum as well as provide an opportunity for students to expand their vocabulary and grammatical skills.  Typical projects include brochures, class presentations, letter writing, and interviews.

 

FREN 112H is the second course in the 3-class introductory series of French.  Students will continue to develop the four fundamental skills in language learning (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) through a variety of activities in an appropriate cultural context.  This class requires daily classroom participation in French and daily practice outside the classroom via traditional written and oral activities as well as audio and written practice via electronic means (online workbook, Blackboard and the Internet).  Class objectives include the ability to communicate in French in oral and written format to perform more complex tasks (e.g. ordering a meal in a restaurant, discussing past events, giving directions, planning trips, discussing current technology, etc.).

Honors students will complete at least three projects in addition to the basic requirements for the course.  These projects will incorporate material from the class curriculum as well as provide an opportunity for students to expand their vocabulary and grammatical skills.  Typical projects include brochures, class presentations, letter writing, and interviews.

 

FREN 210H is the third course in the 3-class introductory series of French.  Students will continue to develop the four fundamental skills in language learning (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) through a variety of activities in an appropriate cultural context.  This class requires daily classroom participation in French and daily practice outside the classroom via traditional written and oral activities as well as audio and written practice via electronic means (online workbook, Blackboard and the Internet).  Class objectives include the ability to communicate in French in oral and written format to perform complex tasks (e.g. discussing artistic and historical heritage, describing daily routines, handling financial transactions and business matters, comparing people and ideas, and expressing ideas about future or what-if situations, etc.). Honors students will complete at least three projects in addition to the basic requirements for the course.  These projects will incorporate material from the class curriculum as well as provide an opportunity for students to expand their vocabulary and grammatical skills.  Typical projects include brochures, class presentations, letter writing, and interviews.

 

FREN 223H is an introduction to readings of literature written in French. Dr. Roussel, who specializes in literature of the French Medieval period and the Renaissance, chose a French anthology to expose students to contextualized literature. Thus, students can learn what Humanism, Renaissance Poetry, the Baroque, French Classicism, the Age of Enlightenment, Realism, Naturalism, Romanticism, the Theatre of the Absurd, and the New Novel encompass. They can learn to appreciate works of literature and visual representations that are presented in this anthology in the light of such concepts, and also to identify music of various styles and centuries which Dr. Roussel plays in class. Throughout the semester, students work on finding examples, in the excerpts studied, of literary definitions found in a glossary at the end of the anthology.  Only one half of the anthology is covered in French 223H. The other half is studied in the follow-up course, French 300H. There, the assignments are devised a notch higher in difficulty. 

 

FREN 324H  INTERMEDIATE CONVERSATION AND COMPOSITION
TEXT: Séquences, Michèle Bissière.  COURSE OBJECTIVE: To enhance your understanding of French grammar and thereby improve the accuracy of written and oral expression. 324 Conversation & Composition introduces a substantial amount of new vocabulary while covering basic French grammar and conjugations. Classes are conducted mainly in French Ï. Group activities are planned to help refine oral expression. EVALUATION: Three (3) compositions (“rédactions”). To improve the grade of any given composition, you are welcome to do one rewrite (“réécriture”) Ï‚ provided you follow the suggested corrections/emendations. Grading criteria are: 1) IDEAS; 2) ORGANIZATION; 3) VOICE; 4) USAGE; 5) MECHANICS.  Three (3) chapter tests (“examens”) but no mid-term or comprehensive final. The last test will be given at the time scheduled for the final exam. Should circumstances force you to miss an examen, it is your responsibility to contact the instructor on or before the day the test is administered so that a make-up can be arranged.


 

MATHEMATICS

Math 242H is the first course in a calculus sequence for students with a strong interest in mathematics and above-average ability. The honors calculus sequence provides a strong background for students planning to take more advanced math courses or courses in other fields requiring substantial mathematics background.
The course material will be divided into several subject areas. For each subject area “A”, “B” and “C” exams will be created. In order to receive a course grade of “A”, a student must pass an “A”, “B”, AND “C” exam from each subject area. To receive a course grade of “B”, a student must pass a “B” and a “C” exam from each subject area. To receive a course grade of “C”, a student must pass by 80-100% a “C” exam from each subject area. Exams may be repeated if a student does not pass on the first attempt. Exams will be taken in the Math Lab (Room 371 JB) at each student’s convenience. Those students who are willing to accept the challenge of new ideas and related problems, those with a keen interest in Math, and student who have completed a prerequisite course with a “B” minimum are encouraged to enroll.


Math 344H is the third course in a calculus sequence for students with a strong interest in mathematics and above-average ability. The honors calculus sequence provides a strong background for students planning to take more advanced math courses or courses in other fields requiring substantial mathematics background.
The course material will be divided into several subject areas. For each subject area “A”, “B” and “C” exams will be created. In order to receive a course grade of “A”, a student must pass an “A”, “B”, AND “C” exam from each subject area. To receive a course grade of “B”, a student must pass a “B” and a “C” exam from each subject area. To receive a course grade of “C”, a student must pass by 80-100% a “C” exam from each subject area. Exams may be repeated if a student does not pass on the first attempt. Exams will be taken in the Math Lab (Room 371 JB) at each student’s convenience. Those students who are willing to accept the challenge of new ideas and related problems, those with a keen interest in Math, and student who have completed a prerequisite course with a “B” minimum are encouraged to enroll.


About the teacher:  Dr. Brady received his PhD from Indiana University.  He has received research grants from NASA  and the National Science Foundation; operates as a computer consultant to the city of Wichita; and writes commercial software.  He also received the Outstanding Educator of America award; the Academy of Effective Teaching Award (2000); the President’s Award for Distinguished Service (2001); the Board of Trustees Award for Excellence in Teaching (2001); and, was Student Support Services Teacher of the Year in 2002.


 

MCLL

MCLL 351H is topically divided into three 5-week segments: writing and sound systems (i.e., phonology); morphology; and syntax and semantics.  A review session is provided every fifth week, followed by a 75-minute test at the next class session. For honors students, each test grade contributes 15% to the student's final grade in the course. Each test consists of multiple-choice and true/false questions; the first test also includes a mix-and-match section which tests students' mastery of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).

Honors students must produce a 10-page term paper on a linguistics topic approved by the instructor no later than 3 weeks before the end of the semester. The term paper must include a bibliography (list of references) and a complete footnote apparatus and must be submitted in final form on the day of the final exam, which honors students must also take. The grade on the final exam is factored as 20% of the student's final grade in the course, while the grade on the term paper is factored as 25% of the student's final grade. The remaining 10% of a student's final grade in the course is determined by 6-8 reading assignments and other homework exercises assigned during the semester.

Honors grading: 3 tests @ 15% each=45%
                1 final exam      =20%
                1 term paper      =25%
                6-8 assignments   =10%

Students who have not had a previous course in linguistics and/or who possess less than optimal basic writing skills (in English) are strongly discouraged from enrolling in MCLL 351H. Students are not allowed to switch from the honors section MCLL 351H to the regular section MCLL 351 after the official course-drop date at the end of the tenth week of the semester.



 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS COURSES FALL 2013

For all courses, please see Schedule of Courses

For further information, please see the Undergraduate Catalog