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HONORS COLLEGE

Honors Courses (HNRS) Catalog Descriptions


Lower-Division Courses

HNRS 101. Introduction to the University (1–3). Designed especially for first-year students, with the goal of preparing students to succeed in college, including graduating in a timely fashion. Provides students with information about: college expectations; academic major, career and life planning; study skills; teaching and learning styles; respecting diversity of thought and culture; critical thinking; leadership training; campus resources; university policies and procedures; personal finances; health and fitness; and the benefits of engagement in student organizations. Students are introduced to faculty and staff from across the campus, and create an individualized graduation plan through a process of developmental advising.

HNRS 104. Seminar I: Fine Arts (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary.
Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of honors director.

HNRS 105. Seminar I: Humanities (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of honors director.

HNRS 106. Seminar I: Social and Behavioral Sciences (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of honors director.

HNRS 107. Seminar I: Mathematics and Natural Sciences (3–5). 1–3R; 1–2L. General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisite: Beginning honors student or permission of honors director.

HNRS 150. Seminar II: Fine Arts (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 104 and 6 additional credit hours, or permission of honors director.

HNRS 151. Seminar II: Humanities (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 105 and 6 additional credit hours, or permission of honors director.

HNRS 152. Seminar II: Social and Behavioral Sciences (3–4). General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 106 and 6 additional credit hours, or permission of honors director.

HNRS 153. Seminar II: Mathematics and Natural Sciences (3–5). 1–3R; 1–2L. General education introductory course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 107 and 6 additional credit hours, or permission of honors director.

 

Upper-Division Courses

HNRS 300. Introduction to the University for Transfer Students (1–2). Designed especially for students who have recently transferred to WSU from another institution, with the goal of preparing students to succeed, including graduating in a timely fashion. Provides students with information about: expectations of WSU professors; academic major, career and life planning; study skills; teaching and learning styles; respecting diversity of thought and culture; critical thinking; leadership training; campus resources; university policies and procedures; personal finances; health and fitness; and the benefits of engagement in student organizations. Students are introduced to faculty and staff from across the campus, and create an individualized graduation plan through a process of developmental advising.

HNRS 304. Seminar III: Fine Arts (3-4). General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 104 and 150 and 12 additional credit hours in any subject, or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 305. Seminar III: Humanities (3-4). General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 105 and 151 and 12 additional credit hours in any subject, or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 306. Seminar Ill: Social and Behavioral Sciences (3-4). General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 106 and 152 and 12 additional credit hours in any subject, or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 307. Seminar III: Mathematics and Natural Sciences (3-5). 1-3R; 1-2L. General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 107 and 153 and 12 additional credit hours in any subject, or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 385. Advanced Academic Writing (3). The main goal of the course is to make Honors students excellent academic writers. Going well beyond ENGL 101 and 102, attention will be paid to topic selection, thesis construction and refinement, the use of supporting evidence, the evaluation of sources, organizing an argument, appropriate diction, and the conventions of various forms of academic writing (from bibliographies and exam answers to research papers and Honors theses). Students will develop their grammatical competence and hone their abilities to express complex ideas clearly, concisely and precisely. A heavy emphasis will be placed on learning by doing, including intense feedback and revision processes. 

HNRS 398. Travel Seminar (1-4). An interdisciplinary travel seminar which allows a student travelling abroad to gain credit for the study of culture; art; literature; architecture; and political, social, scientific, and economic conditions while visiting historic places of interest. Students may enroll under the direction of Director of Honors, a faculty member in any department, or as part of a travel experience organized through Honors

HNRS 404. Seminar in Fine Arts (3-4). Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 304 or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 405. Seminar in Humanities (3-4). Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 305 or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 406. Seminar in Social and Behavioral Sciences (3-4). General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 306 or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 407. Seminar in Mathematics and Natural Sciences (3-4). General education issues and perspectives course. Topics vary. Prerequisites: HNRS 307 or permission of the Honors director.

HNRS 481. Cooperative Education (1-4). Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment. Offered CrlNCr only. Prerequisite: Consent of Honors.

HNRS 481N. Cooperative Education: Internship (1-4). Complements and enhances the student's academic program by providing an opportunity to apply and acquire knowledge in a workplace environment as an intern. Offered CrNCr only. Prerequisite: Consent of Honors.

HNRS 485. Research Seminar (3-4). Students majoring in various disciplines will meet together one hour per week to discuss best practices in academic research, differences in research expectations in different subject areas, the research process (grant writing to publication), research ethics, project management and other issues related to academic research. Guest lecturers from the libraries and various academic disciplines will teach students high level skills needed for successful research. Each student will be responsible for finding a faculty member on campus who will supervise them on a research project during the semester. One-third of the grade will be determined by participation in the class, including written assignments, presentations to the class and other work. The remainder of the grade will be based on the research project completed. This course is meant to supplement, not replace, the Research Methods course found in many disciplines. Students who complete this course will have an excellent grounding in the fundamentals of academic research, exposure to research practices in a variety of disciplines, and experience conducting independent research. Students will therefore be very well prepared for graduate school and/or careers that involve research.