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AEROSPACE ENGINEERING

The 2017

BRONZE PROPELLER COMPETITION 

(Updated 8/31/2016 - Added another Q&A's)

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Some of the excited 2016 participants!
 

Background

The Aerospace Engineering department annually sponsors an aircraft design competition. The goal is to encourage involvement in a fun and educational activity.

Competing teams design and build an electric-powered, remote controlled, aircraft to fly a challenging mission. Undergraduate winners get their names on the Bronze Propeller Trophy. The eighth competition will be held in April 2017. 

There are three participant categories:

  • WSU undergraduate
  • High school
  • Professional

Teams with alumni or graduate members participate in the professional category.

A successful design is well understood and properly developed from the beginning. Don’t let someone create a better overall design than you. Use aerospace engineering principles and methods to win!

Don't be shy. Form a team, build a plane, and fly! Mentors for high school and underclassmen student teams are recommended. Contact Dr. Miller for help finding a mentor. 

 

Mission

This year's design competition is for a “Lightweight High-Speed Emergency Relief UAV." The mission profile includes the following:    

  • Extract and quickly assemble a fully loaded and ready-to-fly aircraft
  • Take-off (hand launch), within 5-minutes of aircraft extraction
  • Deliver the emergency supplies during lap-3
  • Complete at least 5-laps total
  • Land successfully

 

Rules & Guidelines

Competing planes must meet the following requirements and constraints: 

  1. The aircraft (see Q&A #1, added 8/24/16) must be 100% conceived, designed, and built by team members
  2. The aircraft must utilize a single LiPo battery pack to operate all systems
  3. An easy to install/remove propulsion system fuse is required
  4. The fuse must be located at least 6-inches from anything dangerous
  5. The fuse limit can be no larger than 20-amps
  6. Aircraft must be made from commonly available model aircraft materials (e.g., balsa wood, basswood, spruce, foam) – nothing exotic
  7. All critical systems/components must be firmly mounted and accessible for quick repair or replacement (< 5-min)
  8. No more that 2-oz of cured epoxy can be used to construct aircraft
  9. The use of any type of tape to secure anything on the plane is prohibited
  10. Velcro may be used to secure only the battery, Electronic Speed Control (ESC), receiver (RX), and wires
  11. All aircraft components, including the battery and payload, must fit into the deployment container
  12. The transmitter does not have to fit into the deployment container
  13. The container will be of square cross-section (width equal to height) and aspect ratio six (6)
  14. The aspect ratio is defined as the length divided by the height
  15. Each team must register their aircraft with the FAA prior to a first flight
  16. There will be one competition day (likely a Sunday, noon to 4pm, in April)
  17. A designated WSU test pilot will fly the plane at the competition
  18. All primary aircraft components must remain attached during a mission
  19. Mission scores are not counted for aircraft sustaining significant flight related damage
  20. Aircraft changes, during the competition, that deviate significantly from the initial design configuration are not permitted
  21. Aircraft can be repaired and flown again during the competition, as long as all rules are satisfied
  22. All aircraft must pass a specified structural test (see below for details)
  23. All competition rules, requirements, and constraints are subject to interpretation and change at Dr. Miller’s discretion
  24. Additional rules, requirements, and constraints can be added anytime
  25. Review all sections of this web page regularly, especially the Q&A’s
  26. Team members assume all risk with respect to disqualification
  27. Substantial requests for department support, supplies, parts, systems, cutting, etc. within 3-weeks of the competition can not be honored

 

Flying Location

The exact flying location will be announced in the spring. The dimensions are approximately 400x100-ft. Planes are expected to fly within this area at all times. The takeoff, landing, and payload drop zone is in the middle of the course, with turns approximately 300-ft apart. Competition day takeoffs and landings are on grass, not from a prepared hard-surface runway.

 

Scoring

The competition mission score (MSCR) is calculated, when successful, using the following equation,  
                   
     M  = (100/MT) + (VR) + (6/CO) + DAS

The Mission Time (MT), in seconds, starts the moment the plane is launched and ends when the plane successfully lands in the designated zone. The value is rounded to the nearest second.

As noted previously, all aircraft components, the battery, and the payload must fit into a rectangular deployment container. The smallest volume container is desired. A related (volume ratio) scoring parameter is given as,

    VR  = (130/container volume)

The container volume is rounded to the nearest cubic inch.

Vehicle cost is heavily influenced by electronic and control system complexity. As a result, a vehicle complexity/cost scoring parameter is given as:

    CO  = number of actuators, Electronic Speed Controls (ESCs), & motors utilized

A payload of emergency supplies, simulated by one (1) regulation size/weight tennis ball, must be delivered during the third lap within a roughly 30x30-ft square target zone. A Delivery Accuracy Score (DAS) is defined as follows:

    DAS  = 1, if the ball settles within the 30x30-ft zone, but outside a 20x20-ft zone
    DAS  = 2, if the ball settles within the 20x20-ft zone, but outside a 10x10-ft zone
    DAS  = 5, if the ball lands within the 10x10-ft zone

Balls may land, roll or bounce into a zone. The final resting place determines the score.

The team score is then calculated as,

    TSCR  = M – S

The team’s best mission score is used in the final TSCR calculation. “S” is the total number of “strikes” incurred by the team during the entire competition. The highest TSCR wins!

 

Strikes

A team strike is given if the mission fails in any way. Specifically, the mission fails if:

  • The aircraft is not extracted, assembled and in the air within 5-minutes
  • The payload is not delivered within a drop zone during the third lap
  • The aircraft does not fly at least 5 complete laps
  • The aircraft lands outside the takeoff/landing zone
  • The aircraft sustains significant damage during the mission

Teams that crash or sustain significant damage due to “acts of nature” (i.e., extreme weather, bird strike, etc.) will not be assessed a strike, unless Dr. Miller determines the problem was due to design/engineering/preparation/execution issues.

Obviously, you should avoid receiving strikes at all cost. A good team effectively utilizes sound design methods, engineering principles, construction techniques, and preparation to achieve mission success. Don’t undervalue the beauty of simplicity within your efforts.

Keep in mind that proper engineering is not about trial and error or playing around until you find something that works as good as you can discover. Work very hard to keep a zero strike count. Employ engineering methods and prepare!

 

Structural Test

All aircraft must pass a structural test prior to first flight. As a result, all vehicles must include provisions for quickly installing a WSU structural test fixture.

The WSU test fixture and hole mounting dimensions are the same as those used to mount models in the 3x4-ft low speed wind tunnel and are given in the following document (click here for information on the "mount hole pattern," found on page 1, top-rt side). Aircraft must include blind nuts, to allow for easy and quick installation of the test fixture (using only screws).

A dead weight load, equal to the aircraft weight, will be applied through the test fixture. The vehicle will be suspended by no more than 1-inch of the wing tips during the test. Vehicles breaking during the test are not eligible to compete.

 

Department Support & Mentors

The planes will be relatively inexpensive to build. Some teams may be eligible for limited AE department assistance to help build their plane (e.g., radio gear, motor, assorted supplies, laser/foam cutting, etc.). However, support must be requested, prearranged, and approved at least 3-weeks before the competition.

Additionally, as mentioned, the department will do what it can to provide mentors to help less experienced teams. Contact Dr. Miller for further information on support and mentor opportunities.

 

Engineer of 2020

Eligible WSU students, especially seniors, might be able to gain “Engineer of 2020” service-learning credit. These opportunities must be prearranged. Contact Dr. Miller for further information.

 

Q&A's

Visit this section regularly for official Questions and Answers (Q&A’s) that can have an impact on your design efforts.

Q1: Are rotary wing aircraft (e.g., helicopters or quad-rotors) okay to compete?
A1: No, rotary wing aircraft are not allowed. (8/24/16)

Q2: Can the payload, simulated by one (1) regulation size/weight tennis ball, be modified (cut up, deflated, etc.)?
A2: No, the tennis ball payload can not be modified in any way. It must remain a tennis ball (ready to play).

Remember to check this area regularly! Contact Dr. Miller, by email, with questions - scott.miller@wichita.edu

 

Special Thanks

Special thanks go to WSU alumni and friends who provided ideas and suggestions for this year’s competition, including some at the Lockheed Skunk Works.

 

Additional Information

Contact Dr. Miller, by email, with questions - scott.miller@wichita.edu

Here is a Bronze Propeller competition flyer you can print, post, and share (click here)        

 

                       
"What I cannot build, I cannot understand" - Feynman

 

 

 

 

Just for Fun - Here's Some Cool Stuff From the 2016 Competition 

Team Shock Drop won the 2016 Bronze Propeller Competition! Congratulations to the following WSU undergraduate students (L-to-R in photo):

  • Mitchell Thompson
  • Kevin Hagen
  • Chris Oline
  • Wei Khoo
  • Miro Penheiro

Their names will be placed on the historic Bronze Propeller Trophy, located in the WSU Aerospace Engineering office.

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Team Shock Drop - the 2016 Campions!
 

The complete competition results are as follows:

  • 1st-Place     Shock Drop
  • 2nd-Place    Just Wing It 
  • 3rd-Place     I-Drone
  • 4th-Place     Cloud

 

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Team Just Wing It - 2nd Place

 

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Team I-Drone - 3rd Place
 

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Team Cloud - 4th Place

 

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Jonathan Mowrey (left) - The Bronze Propeller test pilot (an amazing pilot!)

 

 

Be sure to visit this page often; don't miss important competition information and news!