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GEOLOGY

EEPS

Geology and Physics

Graduate Courses

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To meet the requirements of differing career goals, students may choose a thesis, internship, or non-thesis option for degree completion. Each option has its own credit hour requirements. To complete EEPS degree, students must take at least 60% of their coursework at the 700-800 level.

See program description for details.

 Undergrad/Grad coursework

EEPS 700.

Technical Sessions (1).

(required for all options within EEPS; must complete total of 2 cr hrs)

Through seminar presentations by students, faculty, and guest lectures, students will critically analyze essential elements and skills of effective oral presentation of scientific research methodology, data, and results to audiences of diverse backgrounds; and will learn techniques of effective use of visual display media, presentation styles, and speaker-audience interactions. Must be taken for two semesters for maximum of 2 credit hours toward the degree. Prerequisite: graduate standing or instructor's consent.

EEPS 701.

Computer Methods in Science (3) 1R; 2L.

(required for all options within EEPS)

Survey of computer applications commonly used by scientists and emphasizes non-statistical applications. Includes computer-assisted instruction, data management, presentation packages, Internet resources, digital image analysis, graphics and spreadsheets, reference acquisition and management, desktop publishing, and specialized applications for modeling, simulations, mapping, and timeseries analysis. Lectures and demonstrations involve individual hands-on activities and student projects. Prerequisites: graduate standing or instructor's consent.

EEPS 702.

Research Methods (1).

(required for thesis and non-thesis (Plan B) options within EEPS)

Essential elements and principles in scientific research, such as project design, funding application, literature research, implementation, collaboration, ethics, and publication. Will include guest resource persons from the library and research offices. Prerequisite: graduate standing or instructor's consent.

EEPS 710.

Great Discoveries and Controversies in Science (3).

Foundation, history, and insights that led to great discoveries in various scientific fields, and which caused great and continuing controversies in scientific theory, the advancement of science, and lessons and perspectives to be learned for future scientific research. Course involves lectures, seminars, literature research, essay writing, and presentation by students. Prerequisite: graduate standing or instructor's consent.

EEPS 720.

Scientific Writing (1).

Procedure, organization, format, and style of a variety of technical and scientific publication vehicles, such as abstracts, professional journal articles, government and industrial reports, and paper and book reviews. Essential elements and skills of effective scientific written communication. This course must be taken in conjunction with any course (except EEPS 889 and 890) that requires extensive writing. May be repeated two times for different courses for a maximum of 2 credits toward the degree. Prerequisite: EEPS 700.

EEPS 721.

Current Issues in Global Environmental Science (3).

(required for all options within EEPS)

Introduces and uses basic concepts relating to ecosystems, habitats, environments, and resources as a basis for understanding environmental problems at different spatial and temporal scales. An interdisciplinary approach frames these problems to facilitate understanding of inter-relationships required for environmental analysis, remediation and management. Prerequisite: EEPS 710 or instructor's consent.

EEPS 760.

Whole Earth Geophysics (3).

Examines the principles of physics as applied to both surface features and the interior configuration of the earth. Studies include an understanding and measurement of the physical properties of magnetism, heat flow, seismicity, and gravity. These physical parameters will be used to determine the internal structure and to explain the active processes of the earth.  Prerequisites: GEOL 111, MATH 243, and PHYS 214 or equivalent, or instructors consent.

GEOL 702.

Environmental Science I (5). 3R; 4L.

Advanced theoretical and applied principles of the interdisciplinary study of environmental science. Includes chemical cycling, atmospheric chemistry, aquatic chemistry, and phase interactions. The laboratory portion addresses local environmental problems from a risk assessment perspective. GEOL 702 and 703 (or equivalent) are required for all graduate students in the EEPS master's program. Prerequisite: acceptance in the EEPS master's program or instructor's consent.

GEOL 703.

Environmental Science II (5). 3R; 4L.

Advanced theoretical and applied principles of the interdisciplinary study of environmental science. Includes environmental chemical analysis, environmental toxicology, aquatic microbial biochemistry, environmental biochemistry, water treatment, photochemical smog, and hazardous waste chemistry. The laboratory portion addresses local environmental problems from a risk assessment perspective. GEOL 702 and 703 (or equivalent) are required for all graduate students in the EEPS master's program.Prerequisite: GEOL 702 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 704.

Environmental Science Colloquium (1).

Cross-listed as CHEM 704.

Students in the EEPS master's program are required to enroll two semesters during their program of study. Includes presentations by guest speakers and required readings for class discussion. May also include student involvement in environmentally related community groups and projects. Graded S/U only. May be repeated for up to four hours credit.

GEOL 706.

Environmental Science Internship (3-6).

Cross-listed as CHEM 706.

Students in the EEPS master's program may gain interdisciplinary skills in environmental science by participating in applied and/or basic research internship projects with local business, industry, or government agencies. Internship option is an alternative to thesis research for degree requirements. Enrollment in internship projects requires an approved proposal. Completion of an internship for graduation requires a formal oral presentation of the internship activity and a written report. Prerequisites: Environmental Science I and II.

GEOL 720.

Geochemistry (3).

The chemistry of natural aqueous solutions and their interaction with minerals and rocks; thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions; emphasizes application to sedimentary environments and environmental problems. Requires some laboratory work. Prerequisites: GEOL 324 and CHEM 212 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 724.

Soils (3).

Geologic analysis of soil types, their formation, occurrence, and mineralogy; soil management and conservation; environmental aspects of soil occurrence including stability studies, pollution, and reclamation.

GEOL 726.

Carbonate Sedimentology (3). 2R; 3L.

The origin and genetic description of carbonate particles, sediments and rocks, mineralogy and textural classifications; depositional environments in carbonate rocks and analysis of modern and ancient depositional system. May require field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 526, 552, or equivalents.

GEOL 727.

Carbonate Diagenesis (3). 2R; 3L.

Analyzes diagenesis of carbonate sediments and rocks. Includes mineralogic stability in natural waters, meteoric, marine and deep-burial diagenesis, dolomitization processes and products; trace-elements and isotopes as diagenetic tools,  cathodoluminescence and x-ray diffraction studies of carbonates; origin and porosity. Prerequisite: GEOL 726 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 730.

Perspectives: Geoscience and the Environment (3).

A perspective of global issues of geoenvironmental concern with regard to past, present, and future exploitation, use, and availability of earth's resources; marine and terrestrial pollution and resource use; water, minerals, and fuel resources; population growth and resource availability; the greenhouse effect, global climactic change, and sea level rise and their effects on populations; future trends in environmental management and remediation of environmental problems of geologic scope. Prerequisite: GEOL 312, 680; or instructor's consent.

GEOL 740.

Basin Analysis (3).

A practical course in analysis of petroleum-bearing or other sedimentary basins; emphasizes detailed subsurface mapping to document depositional, tectonic, and burial history of sedimentary basins; subsurface lithologic and geochemical sample analysis and evolution of sedimentary facies systems and hydrocarbons maturation history. Includes compilation of existing data to determine geologic evolution of basins. Prerequisites: GEOL 682, 684, or instructor's consent.

GEOL 745.

Advanced Stratigraphy (3).

Analysis of stratigraphic sequences at the local to global scales in terms of sequence stratigraphic concepts and highresolution interpretation of depositional sequences (from outcrop and subsurface data); seismic sequence stratigraphy, and significance of unconformities in sequence identification and development; local to global correlation of sequences and sea level history through time; cratonic sequences of North America. Required 7-day field trip. Prerequisites: GEOL 312, 526, and 726. GEOL 750. Workshop in Geology (1-3). Short-term courses with special focus on geological problems. Prerequisites: graduate standing and/or instructor's consent.

GEOL 751.

Advanced Geohydrology (3).

Integrations of practical and theoretical coverage of subsurface fluid flow as applied to shallow aquifers. Covers the mass transport in both the saturated and vadose zones as well as the occurrence and movement of non-aqueous fluids. Covers groundwater quality, sources of groundwater contamination, retardation of contaminants, retardation and attenuation of dissolved solids and the response of inorganic and organic substances to subsurface aqueous and framework chemistries. Computer simulation models used whenever practical along with detailed analysis of case histories, including those related to environmental geoscience. Prerequisite: GEOL 650, 681, MATH 344, or instructor's consent.

GEOL 752.

Climactic Evolution of the Earth (3).

Basics of climatology and paleoclimatology, and recognition of paleoclimatic indicators in the rock record. Climatic changes at different scales in Earth history and possible causes, and nature of climactic records. Roles of climate change on the evolution of Earths biosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. Field trip(s) may be required. Prerequisite: GEOL 721, graduate standing, or instructors consent.

GEOL 760.

Exploration Geophysics (3).

Introduces the theory and application of geophysical techniques for hydrocarbon, mineral, and groundwater prospecting. Includes use of seismic techniques; instrumentation for acquisition on land and sea; seismic processing; structural and stratigraphic modeling; 3-D seismic exploration; and seismic refraction techniques. Prerequisites: completion of geology undergraduate math and physics requirements; MATH 344 or 555; GEOL 324 and 544; and instructor's consent.

GEOL 781.

Advanced Numerical Geology (3).

Involves practical implementation of algorithms and computer code. Includes the analysis of multivariate techniques and the development of the computer/algorithm skills needed to handle very large databases. Covers standard statistical approaches to data analysis; treatment of applied linear algebra and matrix theory; and the application of linear and non-linear discriminate analysis, various factor analytic techniques, hard and fuzzy clustering, linear and non-linear un-mixing analysis, and other forms of data modeling. Prerequisites: GEOL 681 or equivalent, competence in one or more high level computer languages, MATH 344 or 555, and instructor's consent.

GEOL 795.

Earth and Space Physics (3).

Cross-listed as PHYS 795.

An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics will include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earths environment and geologic history. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314, and  MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructors consent.

PHYS 730.

Principles of Computer Modeling (2) 1R; 2L.

Essential elements, principles, and strategies of forward and inverse numerical computer modeling. Formulation of a qualitative problem  (parametrization), model design, implementation, and interpretation of model results. Working knowledge of computational techniques with examples in physics, geology, chemistry, and environmental sciences. Prerequisites: PHYS 616 or EEPS 701, plus knowledge of a programming language or numerical or symbolic mathematics package, or instructors consent.

PHYS 761.

Environmental Physics (3).

Covers the application of physics to the environment, including the production and use of energy, the transport of pollutants, and the study of noise. Topics will include basic thermodynamics with applications to fossil fuels, hydroelectric, wind, geothermal, and solar energies, plus effects on global warming, pollution, and climate. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314 and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructors consent.

PHYS 795.

Earth and Space Physics (3).

Cross-listed as GEOL 795.

An introduction to the geosciences and astrophysics of the solar system. Topics will include the surface, interior and atmospheres of the planets with a comparative planetology approach, and the sun-planet system including solar physics and the effect of the sun on the earths environment and geologic history. Prerequisites: PHYS 313-314, and MATH 242, or EEPS 721, or instructors consent.

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 Graduate only coursework

EEPS 889.

Internship (1-6).

(Course for Internship option only; maximum 6 cr hrs allowed)

Students may gain interdisciplinary skills by participating in applied and/or basic research internship projects with local business, industry, or government agencies. Enrollment in internship projects requires an approved proposal. Completion of an internship for graduation requires a formal oral presentation of the internship activity and a written report. For students choosing the internship option. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours toward the degree. Enrollment is limited to 3 credit hours before a student's internship proposal is approved. Prerequisite: consent of internship supervisor.

EEPS 890.

Thesis (1-6).

(course for thesis option only; maximum 6 cr hrs allowed)

For students choosing the thesis option. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credit hours toward the degree. Enrollment is limited to 3 credit hours before a student's thesis proposal is approved. Prerequisite: EEPS 720 and consent of thesis supervisor.

GEOL 800.

Research in Geology (3). 9L.

(course for non-thesis (plan B) option to fulfill research credit; maximum 3 cr hrs)

Research in special areas of geology: (a) general, (b) mineralogy, (c) petrology, (d) structural, (e) paleontology, (f) economic geology, (g) sedimentation, (i) stratigraphy, (j) geophysics, and (k) petroleum. Requires a written final report. Prerequisite: consent of sponsoring faculty.

GEOL 810.

Advanced Graduate Studies in Geology (1-6).

Systematic study in a selected topic of professional or applied geology. Course given upon demand; repeatable for credit when content differs. May require field trips. Prerequisites: graduate standing, instructor's consent, and two years of professional postgraduate practice in geology.

GEOL 821.

Special Studies in Geochemistry (3).

A systematic study in selected areas of geochemistry. Content differs upon demand to provide in-depth analysis in fields of (a) sedimentary carbonate and silicate geochemistry and mineralogy, (b) organic geochemistry, (c) high pressure and temperature thermodynamics of earth materials, (d) exploration geochemical geochemistry, (e) exogenic geochemical cycling, (f) stable isotope geochemistry. May be repeated for credit to cover all six areas listed. May require some laboratory work. Prerequisite: GEOL 720 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 826.

Sedimentary Petrology (3). 2R; 3L.

Detailed study of sedimentary rocks and their origins. Facilitates determinations of mineral compositions, textures, structures, fabrics, and petrogenetic relationships by the use of thin sections, peels, and geochemical analyses. May require field trips.  Prerequisite: GEOL 526.

GEOL 830.

Field Studies in Geology (2-6).

Off-campus, systematic field study in a selected area or region of geologic significance. Course given upon demand; repeatable for credit when locality and content differ. Where appropriate, travel, lodging, and board costs are charged. Prerequisites: summer field geology (or equivalent) and instructor's consent.

GEOL 840.

Geotectonics (3).

Physical and geological principles of crustal deformation and tectonic interpretation. Studies the relationship of interior earth processes to crustal deformation with special reference to global tectonics. May require field trips. Prerequisite: instructor's consent.

GEOL 852.

Field Stratigraphy (3). 2R; 3L.

Advanced concepts and principles of stratigraphic analysis and interpretation emphasizing original sources and current research investigations. Required field problem and field trips. Prerequisites: GEOL 544 and 552 or instructor's consent.

GEOL 860.

Special Topics in Geophysics (3).

Systematic study in one or more selected topics of theoretical and applied geophysical techniques. Emphasizes applications of state-of-the-art concepts and principles to problems of regional to global significance. Potential topics include seismic stratigraphy, vertical seismic profiling, reservoir petrophysical response estimations, shallow aquifer geophysical modeling, geophysical basin modeling, and regional and global environmental modeling. Prerequisites: GEOL 681, 760; MATH 344 or 555; or instructor's consent.

GEOL 870.

Advanced Biogeology (3). 2R; 3L.

Paleoecological reconstruction of ancient plant/animal communities and environments emphasizing community structure, biostratigraphy, synthesis of total raw data, and problem solving. May require field trips. Prerequisite: a course in biogeology or equivalent.

GEOL 881.

Special Topics in Numerical Geology (3).

Systematic study in one or more topics of theoretical and applied quantitative analysis appropriate for environmental and geological research. Emphasizes applications of state-of-the-art concepts and principles to problems of regional to global significance. Potential topics include quantitative shape analysis, petrographic image analysis, multi-variable linear and non-linear unmixing, extrapolation and interpolation techniques, quantitative isotope chronostratigraphic techniques, modeling global phenomena, and simulations of multi-phase flow in aquifers and reservoirs. Prerequisites: GEOL 681, 781; and Math 344 or 555; or instructor's consent.

PHYS 800.

Individual Readings (1-3).

Repeatable for credit up to 3 hours. Prerequisites: 30 hours of physics and departmental consent.

PHYS 801.

Selected Topics in Physics (2-3).

Repeatable for credit up to 6 hours. Prerequisite:  departmental consent.

PHYS 807.

Seminar (1).

Review of current periodicals; reports on student and faculty research.  Repeatable for credit up to 2 hours. Prerequisite: 20 hours of physics.

PHYS 809.

Research (1-3).

Repeatable for credit up to 6 hours.

PHYS 811.

Quantum Mechanics (3).

The Schrodinger and Heisenberg formulations of quantum mechanics. Applications include rectangular potentials, central forces, and the harmonic oscillator. Also includes spin, time independent and time dependent perturbation theory. Prerequisites: PHYS 621 and 651 or departmental consent and MATH 555.

PHYS 821.

Classical Mechanics (3).

The Lagrangian, Hamiltonian, and Hamilton-Jacobi methods of mechanics and an introduction to variational calculus. Applications selected from central forces, rigid bodies, relativity, small oscillations, and continuous media. Prerequisites: PHYS 621 and MATH 555.

PHYS 831.

Classical Electricity and Magnetism (3).

Maxwell's equations with application to static electricity and magnetism. Also may include electromagnetic fields, vector potentials, Greens functions, relativity, optics, and magnetohydrodynamics. Prerequisites: PHYS 631 and MATH 555.

PHYS 871.

Statistical Mechanics (3).

An introduction to the basic concepts and methods of statistical mechanics with applications to simple physical systems. Prerequisites: MATH 555 and PHYS 621.

PHYS 881.

Solid State Physics (3).

A second course in solid state physics for students who have had an introduction to the subject. Transport, dielectric and optical properties, magnetic properties,  superconductivity, and applications to semi-conductor devices. Prerequisites: MATH 555, PHYS 651 and 681, or departmental consent.