WE THE PEOPLE: American Art of Social Concern

January 20 – March 25, 2018 | Polk/Wilson Gallery

Images (clockwise from the top): 1) Benny Andrews, Symbols, 1970. Oil and collage on canvas, 8 x 36 ft. Gift of Mr. Milton Ratner 2) Luis Cruz Azaceta, LOTTO: THE AMERICAN DREAM, 1992. Screen print, 14 1/2 x 23 in. Museum Purchase 3) Sarah Faust, Red Nails and Dusk, 2002. Chromogenic color print, 18 x 15 7/8 in. Museum Purchase 4)  Leon Golub, INTERROGATION, 1992. Screen print, 26 x 26 in. Museum Purchase

We live in a time of heightened awareness of the broad injustices within our society. Despite the fact that the United States of America was theoretically founded on the principle of equal rights for all citizens, the definition of those who were considered as citizens has shifted over history. Race, gender, and ownership of property have been some of the qualifiers used to deny people equal rights and protections under our Constitution.

Since the mid-19th century, artists have voiced the need for greater awareness and progress toward addressing social concerns such as sexism, economic inequality, and political corruption. The works of art presented in WE THE PEOPLE span from the McCarthy era of the 1950s and continue to the social issues of today.

The exhibition is drawn from the extensive permanent collection of the Ulrich Museum—now numbering almost 7,000 works of art—and is collaboratively curated and presented by Ulrich Director Bob Workman, WSU School of Art, Design & Creative Industries Assistant Professor Dr. Brittany Lockard and the eleven students in the Fall 2017 class Realism/Activism/American Art.

Images (clockwise from the top): 1) Benny Andrews, Symbols, 1970. Oil and collage on canvas, 8 x 36 ft. Gift of Mr. Milton Ratner 2) Luis Cruz Azaceta, LOTTO: THE AMERICAN DREAM, 1992. Screen print, 14 1/2 x 23 in. Museum Purchase 3) Sarah Faust, Red Nails and Dusk, 2002. Chromogenic color print, 18 x 15 7/8 in. Museum Purchase 4)  Leon Golub, INTERROGATION, 1992. Screen print, 26 x 26 in. Museum Purchase

WE THE PEOPLE and its associated programs are made possible by contributions from Mickey Armstrong, The Gridley Family Foundation, John and Nancy Brammer, The Khicha Family Foundation, Dr. Sam and Jacque Kouri, Martin Pringle Law Firm, Ron and Lee Starkel, Clark and Sharon Bastian, Jane McHugh, Louise L. Beren, Eric Engstrom and Robert Bell, Sondra M. Langel, Liz and Bob Workman and an anonymous donor.

Additional generous support provided by Denise and Rex Irwin, Marcia and Ted D. Ayres, Charles E. Baker, Laurie and Mark A. Finucane, Justus H. Fugate, George and Eleanor Lucas, Dr. Pat Purvis, Dr. Dennis and Ann Ross, Don and Ellie Skokan, Dorothy Shannon, Stev Overstreet, John and Kay Morse, Bill, Julia and Luke McBride in honor of Bob Workman, and Dasa and Nalini Gangadhar.

(As of January 2, 2018)

Courtesy of the D.J. Scanlon Political Button Collection

Worn Politics: Selections from the D.J. Scanlon Political Button Collection

In association with WE THE PEOPLE, the WSU Political Science department presents a selection of buttons from the D.J. Scanlon Political Button Collection. The collection is housed in Lindquist Hall but a portion will be on view at the Ulrich Museum through March 25, 2018. The collection ranges from “Truman for Human Rights” to “Reagan/Bush: Make America Great Again,” showing the ways Americans visually expressed their political views.

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Artworks shown on this website are copyrighted by the artists unless otherwise noted, and may not be reproduced without permission of the copyright holder.